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No, and when I read the title it made me want to run for the hills! Eeker but I looked it up after my initial reaction and I thought that if you are in a place where you can engage with the title alone (and its pretty powerful in that it uses the words rape and recovery) it makes it sound like a good resource. I also feel really strongly that the nature of assault is that it is intrusive and legal definitions of what happened are less useful than acknowledging this per se. Which is a long winded way of saying if you find it touches on your experience that's more important than the fact it has the word rape in the title

Finding, I have a couple of suggestions that I've encountered in internships:

1. The Courage to Heal Workbook
This was written specifically for survivors of CSA. Even so, it's been my experience that survivors of rape often have had trauma in childhood too, and I think many if not most or all of the exercises would be experienced as helpful for adult survivors of sexual assault.

1. The Dialectical Behavior Therapy Skills Workbook
This is not specific to sexual abuse or assault. There are exercises in it to teach or increase mindfulness, interpersonal effectiveness, emotion regulation, and distress tolerance, which I think can be helpful because it addresses the dysregulations that occur as a result of trauma without being retraumatizing. Some people benefit from reviewing the story of what happened to them, but some are negatively impacted and just addressing the symptoms may be more advisable at times.

Whatever route you take, dealing with the aftermath of assault of any type requires courage and it is commendable that you are doing so, Finding My Way. Your moniker says a lot. Smiler

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